Diabetes and Aboriginal people

Statistics

Diabetes is a big health problem for Aboriginal people in WA. Below are some key statistics for diabetes in Aboriginal people. There are many reasons for the high number of Aboriginal people with diabetes. You can read about these reasons in our Diabetes and Aboriginal People Information Sheet.

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are three times more likely to have type 2 diabetes compared to non-Aboriginal Australians (Baker IDI, 2012).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost seven times more likely to die from diabetes than other Australians (MacRae et al, 2012).
  • Type 2 diabetes is the second highest condition contributing to avoidable deaths among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (MacRae et al, 2012).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have the highest rate of kidney failure in Australia (Baker IDI, 2012).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote areas are twice as likely to have diabetes as other Australian living in remote areas (MacRae et al, 2012).
  • Compared to other Australian women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are more than 10 times as likely to have type 2 diabetes in pregnancy, and 1.5 times as likely to have gestational diabetes (AIHW, 2010).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have the fourth highest rate of type 2 diabetes in the world (ABS 2008).
  • In some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities 30% of people have diabetes, compared to 4% of the general population (MacRae et al, 2012).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people get type 2 diabetes younger than other Australians (Baker IDI, 2012).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men go to hospital for diabetes 4.4 times more than non-Aboriginal men (MacRae et al, 2012).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women go to hospital for diabetes 6.2 times more than non-Aboriginal women (MacRae et al, 2012).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 38 times more likely to have a lower limb amputated because of diabetes than non-Aboriginal Australians (Norman et al, 2010).
  • The risk of developing type 2 diabetes can be reduced by up to 60% by maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active and following a healthy eating plan (AIHW, 2008).

References

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2008). The health and welfare of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples 2008. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics and Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.
  2. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2008). Diabetes: Australian Facts 2008. Diabetes Series, No 8, Catalogue Number CVD 40. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra.
  3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2010). Diabetes in Pregnancy: Its Impact on Australian Women and their Babies.
  4. Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic and its Impact on Australia (2012). Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute.
  5. MacRae A, Thomson N, Anomie, Burns J, Catto M, Gray C, Levitan L, McLoughlin N, Potter C, Ride K, Stumpers S, Trzesinski A, Urquhart B. Overview of Australian Indigenous health status, 2012. Available from: http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu. au/overview_2013.pdf
  6. Norman, P et al 2010. ‘High Rate of amputation among Indigenous People in WA’, Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 192, no. 7, pp. 421.

 


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